ABOUT ROSE-TINTED SPECTACLES
AND THE CUSTOMER IS KING

LOOKING THROUGH ROSE-TINTED SPECTACLES MAKES THE WORLD SEEM BEAUTIFUL …

Bildschirmfoto-2016-08-26-um-17.34.16

… but this is merely an opti­cal illu­si­on. Erich Käs­t­ner wro­te in his book “When I was a litt­le boy”: “If you look through rose-tin­ted specta­cles, the world appears to be rosy. The view may be pret­ty, but it is merely an opti­cal illu­si­on. It is a result of the specta­cles; that is not how the world real­ly is.”

Paycoach takes a very acti­ve part in dis­cus­sions about what retail will look like in the future. We often rea­li­se that many of the peop­le invol­ved in retail seem to be wea­ring rose-tin­ted specta­cles when it comes to digi­tal cus­to­mer reten­ti­on. They think that their cus­to­mer reten­ti­on world is rosy. They send out a few news­let­ters cal­ling the cus­to­mer by name, address the cus­to­mer in per­son at the check­out using the name on their credit card, and send them a bir­th­day mes­sa­ge. And they think that is enough to gua­ran­tee cus­to­mer retention.

Let us hear what else Käs­t­ner has to say: “Any­bo­dy who con­fu­ses the two will be sur­pri­sed when life takes the glas­ses off their nose.”

Whe­ther in retail or in the ser­vice indus­try, in the digi­tal or the bricks and mor­tar tra­de, doing what almost ever­y­bo­dy else does is not enough. In other words, the cus­to­mer reten­ti­on world is not rosy. This is merely an effect of the glas­ses through which you are loo­king at your cus­to­mers and their beha­viour. As a result, it is best to look at the cus­to­mer reten­ti­on world without any kind of opti­cal illusion.

LEARN MORE …

THE CUSTOMER
IS MORE OF A KING
THAN EVER BEFORE!

20160214-R6B0361-600x400

Nowa­days, retailers and ser­vice pro­vi­ders no lon­ger need to make kings out of their cus­to­mers. The cus­to­mer is more of a king than ever befo­re, and retailers and ser­vice pro­vi­ders must endea­vour to ensu­re that the cus­to­mer does not lose this roy­al status.

Just like kings, modern cus­to­mers are all-power­ful and, more often than not, have mas­te­red their powers digi­tal­ly. Infor­ma­ti­on, pri­ces and ser­vices are con­stant­ly avail­ab­le to them on their smart­pho­nes. It is no lon­ger so easy to decei­ve them. The only thing that still impres­ses a “king cus­to­mer”, is trust. Cus­to­mers are used to being able to con­trol ever­ything. Sud­den­ly, they are shown what trust means.

Trust is estab­lis­hed when the retailer or ser­vice pro­vi­der does not hum­bly indul­ge the cus­to­mers’ new-found power, but ins­tead sur­pri­ses them. For instance if a cus­to­mer hap­pens to lose track of their expen­ses and can no lon­ger meet their finan­cial obli­ga­ti­ons after a purcha­se. To immedia­te­ly give up on them would be reck­less in today’s world, becau­se with new, modern means of com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on, they could quick­ly spread the word throughout their ent­i­re “king­dom”.

And in the eyes of many peop­le, the cus­to­mer would not be the guil­ty par­ty. Ins­tead, the right approach is to coach the cus­to­mer through the unplea­sant situa­ti­on and offer them trust while you help resol­ve the pay­ment difficulty.

LEARN MORE …

ABOUT ROSE-TINTED SPECTACLES
AND THE CUSTOMER IS KING

LOOKING THROUGH ROSE-TINTED SPECTACLES MAKES THE WORLD SEEM BEAUTIFUL …

Bildschirmfoto-2016-08-26-um-17.34.16

… but this is merely an opti­cal illu­si­on. Erich Käs­t­ner wro­te in his book “When I was a litt­le boy”: “If you look through rose-tin­ted specta­cles, the world appears to be rosy. The view may be pret­ty, but it is merely an opti­cal illu­si­on. It is a result of the specta­cles; that is not how the world real­ly is.”

Paycoach takes a very acti­ve part in dis­cus­sions about what retail will look like in the future. We often rea­li­se that many of the peop­le invol­ved in retail seem to be wea­ring rose-tin­ted specta­cles when it comes to digi­tal cus­to­mer reten­ti­on. They think that their cus­to­mer reten­ti­on world is rosy. They send out a few news­let­ters cal­ling the cus­to­mer by name, address the cus­to­mer in per­son at the check­out using the name on their credit card, and send them a bir­th­day mes­sa­ge. And they think that is enough to gua­ran­tee cus­to­mer retention.

Let us hear what else Käs­t­ner has to say: “Any­bo­dy who con­fu­ses the two will be sur­pri­sed when life takes the glas­ses off their nose.”

Whe­ther in retail or in the ser­vice indus­try, in the digi­tal or the bricks and mor­tar tra­de, doing what almost ever­y­bo­dy else does is not enough. In other words, the cus­to­mer reten­ti­on world is not rosy. This is merely an effect of the glas­ses through which you are loo­king at your cus­to­mers and their beha­viour. As a result, it is best to look at the cus­to­mer reten­ti­on world without any kind of opti­cal illusion.

LEARN MORE …

THE CUSTOMER
IS MORE OF A KING
THAN EVER BEFORE!

20160214-R6B0361-600x400

Nowa­days, retailers and ser­vice pro­vi­ders no lon­ger need to make kings out of their cus­to­mers. The cus­to­mer is more of a king than ever befo­re, and retailers and ser­vice pro­vi­ders must endea­vour to ensu­re that the cus­to­mer does not lose this roy­al status.

Just like kings, modern cus­to­mers are all-power­ful and, more often than not, have mas­te­red their powers digi­tal­ly. Infor­ma­ti­on, pri­ces and ser­vices are con­stant­ly avail­ab­le to them on their smart­pho­nes. It is no lon­ger so easy to decei­ve them. The only thing that still impres­ses a “king cus­to­mer”, is trust. Cus­to­mers are used to being able to con­trol ever­ything. Sud­den­ly, they are shown what trust means.

Trust is estab­lis­hed when the retailer or ser­vice pro­vi­der does not hum­bly indul­ge the cus­to­mers’ new-found power, but ins­tead sur­pri­ses them. For instance if a cus­to­mer hap­pens to lose track of their expen­ses and can no lon­ger meet their finan­cial obli­ga­ti­ons after a purcha­se. To immedia­te­ly give up on them would be reck­less in today’s world, becau­se with new, modern means of com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on, they could quick­ly spread the word throughout their ent­i­re “king­dom”.

And in the eyes of many peop­le, the cus­to­mer would not be the guil­ty par­ty. Ins­tead, the right approach is to coach the cus­to­mer through the unplea­sant situa­ti­on and offer them trust while you help resol­ve the pay­ment difficulty.

LEARN MORE …